Apr 21, 2021

Justice is not achieved in one correct decision surrounded by countless unjust ones. This week's Torah portion calls upon us to demonstrate a duty of care to our neighbors as ourselves. 9 minutes and 29 seconds of murder in broad daylight, captured on video, should not be necessary for justice, nor should I forget the relived trauma that repeated footage of a black man being choked to death by a white man's knee causes my neighbor. Langston Hughes said it right in his piercing poem, 'Democracy': "I do not need my freedom when I'm dead. I cannot live on tomorrow's bread," and Maya Angelou taught us well: "Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future and renders the present inaccessible." Waiting is not an option, and we dare not make promises we do not make plans to fulfill. May we recommit to pursuing justice in the memories of George Floyd, Daunte Wright, Adam Toledo, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, and countless other black Americans. May we learn to truly see God in each other's eyes. May we come to truly love our neighbors as ourselves.

 

**SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: NEW BOOK!** “Fault Lines: Exploring the complicated place of Progressive American Jewish Zionism” is now live!

  **SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: NEW BOOK!** “Fault Lines: Exploring the complicated place of Progressive American Jewish Zionism” is now live! My...